Grevy's Zebra

Community Based Conservation with Grevy's Zebra Trust

“Grevy's zebra foals and their protective mothers are inhabiting Naibelibeli plains in high numbers- over 20 very young foals were seen during a drive out to the plains yesterday morning. It is a testament to the good rains and plentiful pasture in Westgate Conservancy. The foals survival will be dependent on the onset of the rains in April, replenishing the diminishing pasture and water resources that are subject to increasing competition from livestock, wildlife and people as the dry season extends.” Image and caption courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust

“Grevy's zebra foals and their protective mothers are inhabiting Naibelibeli plains in high numbers- over 20 very young foals were seen during a drive out to the plains yesterday morning. It is a testament to the good rains and plentiful pasture in Westgate Conservancy. The foals survival will be dependent on the onset of the rains in April, replenishing the diminishing pasture and water resources that are subject to increasing competition from livestock, wildlife and people as the dry season extends.” Image and caption courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust

The Grevy's Zebra Trust conserves the endangered Grevy's zebra and its fragile habitat in partnership with communities. Grevy’s Zebra Scouts monitor them with GPS recordings. There are estimated to be just over 3000 Grevy’s zebras today. WorldWomenWork supports the 19 women scouts. These ladies are part of the WorldWomenWork Nkirreten Project which is equipping local women with the skills to produce their own reusable and biodegradable sanitary pads. This also ensures that girls are not missing out on school due to lack of sanitary pad supplies.

It’s been a while since we’ve shared an update about the important work that Grevy’s Zebra Trust is doing in Kenya and Ethiopia, but in the meantime they’ve been busy. Earlier this year Grevy’s Zebra Trust launched their strategic plan for 2019-2021 to conserve and grow the Grevy’s Zebra population in Northern Kenya.

The entire Grevy’s Zebra Trust Team - photo courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust

The entire Grevy’s Zebra Trust Team - photo courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust

The new GZT Strategic Plan has put our activities into laser-sharp focus for the next three years! Our Mission? To conserve and grow the Grevy’s zebra population in northern Kenya.
To achieve this, every single member of the GZT family needs to be aware of the new strategy and the objectives and goals that will help us achieve our mission.
With 96 GZT family members at camp last week, we internally launched the new strategic plan through an incredible and inspiring two days of team building, where the activities focused around the major components of the plan. This has given us the strongest base to achieve conservation success.
— Grevy's Zebra Trust
Photo courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust

Photo courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust


Besides our women-focused scout program, GZT has also encouraged the local Nkirreten women in the Wamba region to participate in safeguarding their endangered Grevy’s zebras while also economically empowering themselves through the production of reusable sanitary pads. The dignity of the communities’ women and school going girls is preserved while the unique black and white stripped pads help spread the mission of our conservation efforts.
— Grevy's Zebra Trust
“As part of GZT’s school outreach program, our Wamba Regional Coordinator, Andrew Letura was accompanied by Jamarose, one of the Grevy’s zebra scouts to Ngaremara Primary School where pupils had an interactive session on how they could contribute towards the conservation of the endangered zebras in their local communities.” Caption and image courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust.

“As part of GZT’s school outreach program, our Wamba Regional Coordinator, Andrew Letura was accompanied by Jamarose, one of the Grevy’s zebra scouts to Ngaremara Primary School where pupils had an interactive session on how they could contribute towards the conservation of the endangered zebras in their local communities.” Caption and image courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust.

“In Sukuroi zone, Westgate Conservancy, community members have been voluntarily clearing the invasive species, Acacia reficiens, from the rangelands. Nearly immediately, Grevy’s zebra moved into the cleared site, making the most of the open spaces to graze.” Caption and image courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust.

“In Sukuroi zone, Westgate Conservancy, community members have been voluntarily clearing the invasive species, Acacia reficiens, from the rangelands. Nearly immediately, Grevy’s zebra moved into the cleared site, making the most of the open spaces to graze.” Caption and image courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust.

“Being a great source of the extra minerals that they need, termite mounds are valued commodities for Grevy's zebras.” Photo courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust

“Being a great source of the extra minerals that they need, termite mounds are valued commodities for Grevy's zebras.” Photo courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust


“Our supplementary feeding program was a welcome relief for this herd of Grevy's zebras that was captured by one of GZT's camera traps feasting on the hay that was left for them at Tirgamo corridor in Laisamis.” Photo and caption courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust

“Our supplementary feeding program was a welcome relief for this herd of Grevy's zebras that was captured by one of GZT's camera traps feasting on the hay that was left for them at Tirgamo corridor in Laisamis.” Photo and caption courtesy of Grevy’s Zebra Trust

Grevy's Zebra Trust in Kenya and Ethiopia and the WorldWomenWork Scholarship Program

Today we need to connect to things that are real and uplift our spirts. The Grevy's Zebra Scout Ladies are just that. The Grevy's Zebra Trust conserves the endangered Grevy's zebra and its fragile habitat in partnership with communities. The scouts monitor them with GPS recordings of their findings. There are estimated to be just over 3000 today. WWW supports the 19 women scouts. These ladies are part of the WWW Nkirreten Project which is equipping local women with the skills to produce their own reusable sanitary pads. It also ensures that girls are not missing out on school due to lack of sanitary pad supplies.

Grevy's Zebra Scouts

Congratulations to Ngeeti Lempate known as 'Mama Grevy'. She won the 2017 Disney Conservation Hero Award in recognition of her incredible 15 year career as a Grevy's Zebra Scout

I am so happy and lucky to receive this Disney Award. It means a lot, and it has made me see the importance and contribution of my work to the world in conservation. It is also a celebration not only for me but also for my community - for their support and the chance they gave me to realize my potential in conservation.
— Ngeeti Lempate 'Mama Grevy'
grevy's zebra


Retetti, in northern Kenya is the first community owned elephant sanctuary in Africa. These two Grevy's live there too. I met them a year ago when they had just been rescued. Look at them now. They will soon be released into the wild. Another success story.

WorldWomenWork Scholarship Program

WWW Scholarship Program

WWW supports 5 girls who attend boarding school in Wamba, northern Kenya. It is such a privilege to visit them and see the strict but inspiring atmosphere they live in. Not only do we have the sanitary pad project but also this. The most important thing we can do is keep girls in school. It only takes $1,000 a year to change one life.

I thank all of you who make the work of WWW possible. I hope you feel inspired too!

2017 Highlights: The Orphan Project with Save the Elephants and more

2017 has been an amazing year for WorldWomenWork.


These are just a few of the highlights:
We have completed our $400,000 commitment to "The Orphan Project" with Save The Elephants. An orphan sanctuary for Grevy's Zebra has been built at the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary in Northern Kenya and a workshop for the Grevy's Zebra Nkirreten (sanitary pad) Project has been built. A beautiful safari bus has been acquired and outfitted for conservation expeditions for Ewaso Lions. And two great WorldWomenWork adventure trips, Walking with Elephants in Myanmar and Walking in Zambia and Botswana have changed lives!

2017 with WorldWomenWork thanks to your efforts.

The brutality of humanity is often too much to bare, but there are still true inspirations happening all around us.

Munteli and her new companion Nanyori sit in her Suzuki below. The Mama Simba are powerful women who by learning to read and write are taking on the world for their lions!
~
You, our donors, are a powerful force because you make it all happen.
YOU ARE WORLDWOMENWORK.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

With Thanks and Gratitude, Singer


Ewaso Lions

WorldWomenWork October Update

We watched, mesmerized as young lions played with a canoe paddle on our recent WWW adventure to Botswana and Zambia. There is no way to describe this magnificent and innocent moment. Meanwhile North Korea was involved in wildlife trafficking and in Myanmar elephants were being poached with poisoned arrows and skinned, their skin used for 'health' jewelry. Even when terribly depressed by the world's inhumanity something inspiring is taking place, which keeps our passions alive.

Singer Rankin

Nothing personifies this more than the story of Kabu's rescue 2 years ago. Many of you helped to make this possible. She worked for 20 years in the logging industry despite a terrible injury to her left front leg while also having two babies. The first female baby was sold to a tourist camp and the little male died after the torture of the training crush. She is the epitome of resilience, a beautiful and gentle elephant loved by all who visit the Elephant Nature Park. Lek Chailert is a savior who inspires all who meet her.

Singer with the Grevy's Zebra Scouts

After being in Thailand with Kabu and Lek, I spent time in Samburu with the Grevy's Scouts and one of the highlights was trying to sew a sanitary pad on one of the new sewing machines WWW contributed. I was the center of a lot of laughter. I felt as though I was finally accepted into this amazing group. Not only are they tracking Grevy's with GPSs they are making additional income with a sanitary pad project which also enables their daughters to stay in school. These women are a true inspiration.

Samburu in Northern Kenya

Samburu in northern Kenya is experiencing an unparalleled drought. The food situation is desperate for wildlife. The herders of cattle and goats invade the conservation areas causing armed conflict. We were fortunate to be able to help distribute hay for the Grevy's. In one area diseases carried by domesticated animals wiped out packs of wild dogs.

A young elephant enjoying a snack at Sheldrick Wild Life Trust in Nairobi.

A young elephant enjoying a snack at Sheldrick Wild Life Trust in Nairobi.

I thank you so much for being a part of WorldWomenWork. You make everything we do possible. You are a part of every project. I hope that through these stories you feel just as inspired as I do.

Even though there is much to be depressed about in the wild world there is much to inspire us to feel passionately, to want to give back, to help.

Grevy's Zebra Orphans at the Reteti Sanctuary

Grevy's Zebra Orphans at the Reteti Sanctuary

These two adorable Grevy’s zebra, Ntapuli and Loituko, are being hand raised at the Reteti Sanctuary in Samburu, Northern Kenya. Ntapuli was rescued when he was 1.5 months old after he was seen frantically running around all alone near a small town, with his mother nowhere in sight. After waiting to see if his mother would return, Grevy’s Zebra Trust’s Simon Matacho, a Grevy’s Zebra Scout, successfully rescued Ntapuli together with the team from Reteti Sanctuary.

Loituko was saved after his mother was eaten by a lion in Il Ngwesi Conservancy. He was so tiny that when he first arrived at Reteti, his chances of survival looked slim. But under their expert care, his health gradually improved. Now, the two young Grevy’s zebra are thriving under the expert care of their Samburu keepers Lekupanai and Lengokwai. The chances of their integration back into the wild are high as Reteti Sanctuary is close to prime Grevy’s zebra habitat.

Grevy’s zebra is an endangered species and each life we save matters. You can be the bridge between rescue and success!

We hope to raise sufficient funds to support the ongoing care for Ntapuli and Loituko. Your donation will support the following:

Formula - $450 a month
Keepers x 2 - $200 each per month
Predator-Proof Stables and Enclosure - $4,000 (one-off cost)
Veterinary - $100 a month

About Grevy’s Zebra:
The Grevy's zebra is one of Africa's most endangered large mammals. The species has undergone one of the most substantial reductions of range of any African mammal. The current global population is estimated at 2,500, with more than 90% in northern Kenya where the Grevy’s Zebra Trust operates. The population appears to have stabilized thanks to the conservation.

Grevy's Zebra Orphans at the Reteti Sanctuary
Grevy's Zebra Orphans at the Reteti Sanctuary
Grevy's Zebra

WWW supports the Grevy’s Zebra Trust’s Scholarship program, the Scouts and the Sanitary Pad project.

Grevy's Zebra Update

Grevy's Zebra

There are less than 2,500 Grevy's Zebras left in the world.
The Grevy's Zebra Trust needs our help!

Grevy's Zebra Trust
Grevys Zebra Trust
Grevy's Zebra Scouts

The Grevy's Zebra Trust has been monitoring herds and conserving habitats through partnerships within communities in the northern Kenya region since 2007. 

In 2015, the Grevy's Zebra program was able to to reduce poaching incidents in El Barta by 60% through engaging communities that live off of wildlife and providing them alternative income through conservation. In 2009, the proportion of foals and juveniles among the population increased from 12-21%, and remains at this level today.

The Grevy's Zebra Trust is doing amazing work, and we are so proud to be a partner in these projects. We all need to protect these magnificent creatures before it is too late.

WorldWomenWork's supports the Grevy's Zebra Trust through funding 5 educational scholarships that send local Samburu girls to secondary school. We also provide the salaries of 5 scouts that track and monitor the zebra herds. WorldWomenWork also provides the full funding for the Nkirreten Project. 

The Nkirreten project is a program that trains women to fabricate and sell reusable sanitary pads. This program not only provides a less expensive hygeine product for local women so they can continue with their everyday lives during menses, but it also gives local women an alternative income source through the sales of the pads. As a bonus, this project promotes environmentally friendly consumption.

At WorldWomenWork, we believe that the way to protect endangered species and conserve the natural world is through empowering local women. By providing educational opportunities and environmental training, we are preparing a new generation of leaders to protect our world.

In 2015, the Grevy's Zebra trust trained a total of 685 women, 591 elders, 491 warriors and 31 local leaders to improve environmental stewardship. Just imagine how much more they can do with your help. 

Your support of this program in 2017 will be able to provide the salaries of more scouts to protect the endangered Grevy's Zebra and more educational opportunities for girls and women. 

Thank you for all that you do. 

The Grevy's Zebra Trust

Grevy's Zebra Trust

The Grevy’s Zebra Trust helps conserve the endangered Grevy’s Zebra and their fragile habitat. It is estimated that there are only 2,000 Grevy’s Zebras left.

WorldWomenWork helps support the Trust and director Belinda Mackey by employing underserved women from communities that share the zebra’s land. WorldWomenWork provides the salaries for thirteen scouts who monitor the zebras and collect critical data for understanding the animals and their plight. In 2012, scholarships were provided for five young women to begin a secondary education. These young students are a rarity in these communities where girls almost never have an opportunity for a high school education. Students and their greater community also witness firsthand that preserving an endangered species brings great benefits.

Grevy's Zebra Trust

Did you know that for only $7 you can provide one woman with enough reusable sanitary pads for one year? Well, you can through the Grevy’s Zebra Trust Sanitary Pad Project.

The goal of this program is to empower women through the production and marketing of reusable sanitary pads. The Grevy’s Zebra Scout ladies are trained in the fabrication of the pads, and they in turn sell them to their peers and community members. In April 2015, 29 women and 10 men participated in training workshops to make the sanitary pads.

By providing women with accessibility to feminine hygiene products, we are giving them freedom over their biology. This program will enable girls and women to improve their personal hygiene and health, as well as providing school-going girls with the confidence to continue classes during their menstrual cycle.

In order for the conservation of the Grevy’s Zebra to be successful, it is important for the community to thrive. This program provides yet another avenue for alternative income for women of the community. By investing in the improvement of the livelihoods of these women, we strengthen the connection between the community and the Grevy’s Zebra.

In 2015, WorldWomenWork funded this program through the generosity of our donors.